Planetfall, by Emma Newman

Planetfall

  • Genre
    • Science Fiction, Suspense, Space Colonization
  • Plot Summary
    • I don’t know how to describe this without spoiling anything. When this book was recommended to me, it was recommended that I read it without any knowledge of what was to come, and I’m so glad I did. So I’ll give you details about some of the fun things to come in the sections below, but for plot I’ll just say, strap in and enjoy the ride.
  • Character Empathy
    • The protagonist is richly developed, to the point that even when you think she’s doing something completely wrong and foolish you still want it to work out for her somehow. Her secrets make her somewhat isolated from the others, so you can’t get to know them as well, but they are still interesting, multifaceted and likable.
    • This story does not give you a straightforward villain. Antagonists, yes, as well as people who make decisions that are hard to condone. But the reasons they have make it difficult to judge them. I love books that can truly pull that off, and this one does.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • It’s like a Hitchcock movie; sheer, agonizing suspense that never sacrifices character for plot or resorts to cheap tricks to make you jump.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • A bio-engineered extraterrestrial colony that was well thought out and like nothing I’ve ever read before.
    • Brilliantly paced exposition. I was always curious but never frustrated or confused. So few writers can pull that off, and I’ve gotten used to forgiving some missteps, but Emma Newman did not have a single moment to apologize for.
    • Most of the main characters are POC. The protagonist is Black and a lesbian. Nobody in the colony thinks this is a big deal.
    • One of the most relatable descriptions of an anxiety disorder that I’ve ever read.
    • Questions about the intersections of religion and science that were organic to the plot, dodged every cliche and managed hit that sweet spot between frustratingly vague and boringly preachy.
  • Content Warnings
    • There is no shortage of anxiety involved when reading this, but I can’t think of anything specifically graphic or commonly triggering.
  • Quotes
    • “I think “majority” is one of my least favorite words. It’s so often used to justify bad decisions.”
    • “That scared me more than anything, sometimes; the noise of my thoughts, the sense that even the space inside myself wasn’t safe.”
    • “That was the second major lie I told that week. It gets easier, in some ways; now I lie without expending any effort. But I think each one has its own weight. One alone may barely register, like a grain of sand in the palm of one’s hand. But soon enough there’s more than can be held and they start to slip through our grasp if we are not careful.”
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