The People Could Fly, by Virginia Hamilton

people could fly

  • Genre
    • Folklore
  • Plot Summary
    • A series of tales passed down by generations of Black storytellers, gathered from collections and primary sources by award winning children’s author Virginia Hamilton.
  • Character Empathy
    • As with oral folklore found around the world, the characters are more archetypes than individuals. However, this book does bring subtle but powerful empathy for it’s storytellers, as Virginia Hamilton points out the elements of the stories that came from the struggles of slavery and reconstruction. 
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • The loving care put into this project is evident on every page. So many of these stories have either been erased from mainstream folklore collections, or only presented in whitewashed or minstrelized versions. This was a work that came from a passionate hunger to put these stories back in their rightful place.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • I loved the variety in this collection. There’s humor, fairy tales, animal fables, riddles and tall tales. I love studying the common roots of fairy tales, and I saw ones that clearly shared DNA with stories I’ve read since childhood, and ones that were brand new to me. Either way, I was a very happy folklore geek.
    • Each story comes with a note on the cultural and historic context, which again made the folklore geek in me really happy.
    • Virginia Hamilton worked very hard to add in elements of the original dialects, enough to make it evocative and honor the original voices but not enough to confuse the average reader (as opposed to those old Uncle Remus collections that are almost unreadable). In my opinion, she hit that balance perfectly.
    • Most of the stories are pure fun, but the title story was so beautiful I honestly got a little choked up. 
  • Content Warnings
    • It is intended to be suitable for parents to read to their children, so there’s nothing to talk about here. 
  • Quotes
    • (from the author’s introduction) “These tales were created out of sorrow. But the hearts and minds of the black people who formed them, expanded them, and passed them on to us were full of love and hope. We must look on the tales as a celebration of the human spirit.
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