Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, by Caitlin Doughty

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

  • Genre
    • Nonfiction
  • Summary
    • A mortician describes her early years of working at a crematory, blending her experiences in the industry with insights into the human struggle to deal with death. 
  • Information
    • There’s a little of everything in here. There’s biology, history, anthropology, economics, and a fair bit of practical philosophy. She explores what actually happens when the body dies, how our attitudes towards death have changed, how different cultures around the world deal with death, and what our knowledge of our own imminent demise does to make us human beings.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • If you’ve watched her Youtube channel, you’re probably well prepared for Caitlin Doughty’s style. She’s funny and poignant all at once, mixing wry observations and weird anecdotes with some of the most beautifully existential musings you’ll ever hear. 
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • I love her descriptions of the people she meets. She can simultaneously make you smile at someone’s human foibles and deeply empathize with them as people going through one of the hardest experiences a human will have to bear; burying a loved one. 
    • I also love when she talks about non-Western attitudes towards death. There’s a bit where she describes the cosmology and beliefs of a certain cannibalistic society, and what that act actually means to them, and soon I was thinking, “aw, that’s really sweet.” I got teary when I heard about how the colonialists came in and made them stop. Stupid imperialists.
    • If this book has a main goal, it’s to make you think more complexly about death and how we deal with it, and to see how our society in particular has gotten seriously bad at providing ways for people to cope. I keep wanting to say something like, “this book isn’t for everyone, but if it sounds like something you’d be into, you’re definitely right.” But I also want to recommend this to people who wouldn’t think they’d be into it. I want this book to be read by people who are afraid of death, afraid of thinking about it, afraid of examining their reaction to it. I feel like, with all the disturbing elements, this book will make you realize that you can see the realities of death and, afterwards, you’ll still be okay. Death is inevitable. It doesn’t have to be terrifying.
  • Content Warnings
    • Descriptions of decomposition and dead bodies. How they die is mentioned but not generally described in detail. 
    • She also reflects on her own mental health experiences. Some of this might be triggering, especially for those with a history of suicide.
  • Quotes
    • “Accepting death doesn’t mean you won’t be devastated when someone you love dies. It means you will be able to focus on your grief, unburdened by bigger existential questions like, “Why do people die?” and “Why is this happening to me?” Death isn’t happening to you. Death is happening to us all.”
    • “Death might appear to destroy the meaning in our lives, but in fact it is the very source of our creativity. As Kafka said, “The meaning of life is that it ends.” Death is the engine that keeps us running, giving us the motivation to achieve, learn, love, and create.”
    • “The great triumph (or horrible tragedy, depending on how you look at it) of being human is that our brains have evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to understand our mortality. We are, sadly, self-aware creatures. Even if we move through the day finding creative ways to deny our mortality, no matter how powerful, loved, or special we may feel, we know we are ultimately doomed to death and decay. This is a mental burden shared by precious few other species on Earth.”
    • “If my decomposing carcass helps nourish the roots of a juniper tree or the wings of a vulture—that is immortality enough for me. And as much as anyone deserves.”
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s