Coal, by Audre Lorde

Coal

What It’s About

An early collection of poems on identity and society by an iconic activist.

Why I Think You’d Like It

In my last review, I said how much I love Dothead’s transparency; how it does not alienate those new to poetry by hiding the point. But please don’t take that to mean that subtler, puzzling poems are any less worth reading. There is something positively thrilling about poems that hit you with a feeling you can’t quite explain, then make you hungry to go back, dig deeper, put fragment after fragment together until the whole meaning hits you. It’s like solving a crossword, but the crossword is also a sacred, beautiful hymn to all of life’s mysteries.

The only trouble is that those kinds of poems are easy to fake. It’s easy to create bewilderment without payoff. Too many poets with nothing to say hide behind obscurity, punishing their readers with a fruitless chase. They train other cowardly pseudo intellectuals to hide behind incomprehensibility, while teaching the truly curious to dislike poetry.

The best antidote to that is a poet who has real ideas behind their words. One who knows how to tantalize you with poignant images and beautiful flashes of understanding, rewarding the readers who read over and over again, until the full truth comes out.

Anyway, if you like that kind of thing, Coal by Audre Lorde is a fantastic book, and it happened to be written by a Black queer feminist civil rights pioneer and overall badass human being.

Content Warnings

Many poems talk about oppression, isolation and emotional pain, but while the language is moving it is generally not graphic.

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