Shadowshaper, by Daniel Jose Older

Shadowshaper

What It’s About

A secret society of magicians in New York City, who use murals to channel spiritual power.

Why I Think You’d Like It

As I try to describe this book, the word that keeps coming to mind is “smart.” It’s a book that fits neatly into a genre niche, specifically the YA Chosen One Coming-of-age-while-exploring-a-hidden-magical-world niche, without any pretense. It knows what it is and it means to be what it is. And yet, with every trope and character type and turning point, you get something that’s just a little bit more creative, more thought out, and more authentic than the usual fare.

Take the old cryptic elders trope. Authors rely on this to avoid long stretches of tensionless exposition. Instead, they make you wait for information and draw out the suspense, so that when it’s time for an infodump you’re invested. Unfortunately, their stories don’t always justify the withholding of information. Sometimes it’s even out of character (why do these wise old mentors never educate their protagonists? Isn’t that literally their entire job?). Still, this trope serves a narrative purpose, and we, the audience, just sigh and go along with it because we know we don’t actually want a big string of exposition in chapter three.

But in Shadowshaper, the author gets the radical idea that maybe mentors withhold information because of character flaws. Maybe they have anxieties and gaps in their understanding and even prejudices. This creates a far more satisfying explanation, as well as adding dimension to the supporting cast, and forcing the protagonist to be proactive in sorting through the conflicting, piecemeal information. This turns into quests and conflicts that have real emotional weight when they are finally resolved. One smart decision, and not only has an annoying cliche been avoided, but every resulting plot thread has become just that must stronger.

This kind of thing keeps happening. I know what kind of story this is, and so I know where it’s going, but in getting there it keeps taking a path that is better on every level. The result is something that feels very polished and satisfying. Something that aims to be the best at what it is, and succeeds.

If you like that YA Chosen One coming-of-age-while-exploring-a-hidden-magical-world subgenre, you’ll like this book. If you used to like that genre, but went off it because of too many lazy cliches, you’ll love this book.

Content Warnings

Not much to warn about. There’s some scary fantasy monsters and personal explorations of identity that, since the protagonist is a Black Hispanic girl, dip into all the bigoted isms, but author knows how to acknowledge real world issues without either trivializing them, or letting them overwhelm and bog down the adventure. Like I said, it’s a smart book.

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