The Paper Menagerie, by Ken Liu

Paper Menagerie

What It’s About

A series of sci-fi and fantasy shorts that explore humanity’s past, future and soul.

Why I Think You’d Like It

I love the idea of alternate history. I want to better understand history, and I think a powerful tool in that understanding is imagining what things might have been like, had a few details turned out differently. Unfortunately have seen two alternate history stories that I thought were good. One is the mockumentary C. S. A. :The Confederate States of America, which is one of the few “what if the South won the Civil War” takes that is not blatantly southern apologist, but is instead equal parts satire of southern apologism, and chilling dystopia on par with 1984. The other one is “A Brief History of the TransPacific Tunnel,” the thirteenth story in this book. It is equal parts an intimate redemption story, and a complex, immaculately researched look at the interwoven threads of history. In a handful of pages, it speaks more profoundly about the intersection of politics, economics and social movements than most textbooks. Without sacrificing impact for subtlety, or subtlety for impact, it raises unsettling questions about effects vs intentions, sacrifices, and the costs of progress. And while exposing humanity at it’s worst, it also exposes raw, brutal hope.

If this book only had a couple of stories on that level of excellence, that would be reason enough for a recommendation. But honestly, every one is on that level; quality characterization, beautifully crisp language, Black Mirror-level thought provoking while still lovely and cautiously optimistic. What’s still more staggering is the sheer diversity of stories. There’s a sweet, personal coming of age story about a world where everyone’s soul manifests as a physical object, and a young woman who must carefully protect her ice cube heart. There’s a tense cyberpunk detective noir where a PI hunts a serial killer with a bizarre MO. There’s a strangely poignant encyclopedia entry on the writing systems of interplanetary species.

The stories in these books have swept up Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy awards like so many crumbs, and it’s no surprise. Ken Liu takes on every subgenre of science fiction and fantasy and masters them all.

Content Warnings

Some stories discuss racism or violent events. For the most part, they are at most moderately intense, but two, The Literomancer and The Man Who Ended History, have especially graphic torture scenes. In both cases, the torture is completely necessary to the points the stories are making. The latter is especially important because it is an accurate account of historical events. But man, it is rough.

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