Tag Archives: diverse books

The Ghost Bride, by Yangsze Choo

The Ghost Bride

  • Genre
    • Horror, Ghost Story, Historical Fiction
  • Plot Summary
    • Li Lan, a beautiful young woman from a family fallen on hard times, is asked if she wants to become a ghost bride; an unusual custom used to placate the restless dead. When she declines, she finds that her undead suitor is persistent, and tied to deeper secrets than she could have imagined. 
  • Characters
    • I really liked Li Lan, as well as the side characters. Their quirks, histories and foibles were well developed. The bad guys had enough tragic pasts and difficult situations to make you feel sorry for them, but were still despicable enough to make you root for their downfall. The good guys had enough flaws to be relatable, but were heroic enough to make you hope for their success. Special shoutout to Amah, who was a delightful mother figure and mentor. 
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • Gothic and creepy, with a good bit of fantasy adventure thrown in. I think this would be a good one for anyone who likes scary material, but wants to spend more time excited or in suspense than disturbed and horrified. 
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • The setting is actually Victorian Malaysia, but focused on the Chinese community within it. The author is Malaysian of Chinese descent, so it’s not some exoticized stereotype, but a breathing world portrayed with the warmth of familiarity. It was a setting that was completely unfamiliar to me, and it was delightful to get to see a bit of it through the eyes of an insider.
    • She adds end notes on the history, culture and folklore that inspired it.  
    • The afterlife and magic system is well developed, unique and fun. It is heavily based on Chinese and Malaysian beliefs and mythology, but there are also elements she invented for herself, and they all blend together beautifully.
    • Lots of great female characters, both heroic and villainous. Bechdel’s Test is easily passed.
  • Content Warnings
    • Possessions and stalking; probably the creepiest thing about Lim Tian Ching, the ghost who haunts Li Lan, is how much of a realistically entitled pervert he is. 
  • Quotes
    • “It seemed to me that in this confluence of cultures we had acquired one another’s superstitions without necessarily any of their comforts.”
    • “I liked the moon, with its soft silver beams. It was at once elusive and filled with trickery, so that lost objects that had rolled into the crevices of a room were rarely found, and books read in its light seemed to contain all sorts of fanciful stories that were never there the next morning.”
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The Frangipani Hotel, by Violet Kupersmith

The Frangipani Hotel

  • Genre
    • Horror, Suspense, Ghost Stories
  • Plot Summary
    • A collection of ghost stories and monster tales, centered around the aftermath of the Vietnam War.
  • Character Empathy
    • I loved the variety of the viewpoint characters. Some were cynical and detached, some curious and naive, some lonely or depressed, some heartless, some too compassionate for their own good. Depending on whose eyes you are looking for, you might more or less insight into the other characters. However, even with the most jaded and unobservant characters, the author gives you glimpses of the facets they might be missing, all without violating the point of view. It’s fantastic and brilliant. 
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • Creepy, but also oddly charming. I’ve always thought that horror is most effective when paired with something loved or lovable; if you don’t love something, how are you going to get attached, and so why should you be afraid? Here, the love most often comes from the sense of place. You can tell that the author loves Vietnam (her mother was a refugee from the war, and Violet Kupersmith later returned to study there). She draws you into even the dingiest alleys and most polluted landscapes, and makes you long to protect it from the monsters that are about to break out onto it.
    • She’s also an absolute master of suspense. She knows that less is sometimes more, and always keeps you guessing about what she’s going to show you, and what she’ll leave to your imagination.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • A creepy water woman who could probably eat Odysseus’ sirens for breakfast.
    • The first story is dialog only. I’m kind of a sucker for stories that take those kinds of gimmicks and make them work naturally. She definitely pulled it off.
    • A cranky old truck driver’s story about the time he transported a shark… and it’s not even the main ghost story, just beautifully weird set dressing.
    • A sweet old man who happens to spend part of his life as a giant snake. That’s shiny to me, because I like both sweet old men and cool snakes.
  • Content Warnings
    • Creepy bodies, monsters, a pinch of body horror… the usual fare for this genre.
    • There is one story, Skin and Bones, that might be triggering for people with eating disorders. Still read the book, just skip that one.
  • Quotes
    • “Con, if you were listening you would have learned almost everything you need to know about your history. The first rule of the country we come from is that it always gives you what you ask for, but never exactly what you want.
    • “Thuy didn’t mind that she and her grandmother couldn’t speak to each other. In fact, she rather liked it, and found that their mutual lack of language skills freed them from the banalities of conversation.”
    • “They had discovered that excitement is really just smog and noise and never seeing the stars, and trash piled up in the streets. They would ride with their heads out the window, their faces softening as the city fell away and the world turned flat and emerald-colored again; they were waiting for the moment when we crossed into their province, when they would smack the dashboard and cry out, “Here! Here!”
    • “Sometimes kids will sit on the lower branches and try to fish, but everyone knows that there’s nothing to catch in Hoan Kiem but empty Coca-Cola cans and used heroin needles. Legend says that centuries ago, a giant turtle lived at the bottom of the lake, and it once gave a magic sword to a general to help him defeat the Chinese invaders. I’m supposed to tell the story to all the tourists who stay at the Frangi.”

American Born Chinese, by Gene Luen Yang

American Born Chinese

  • Genre
    • Graphic Novel, Young Adult, Coming of Age, Fantasy
  • Plot Summary
    • This book interweaves the stories of Jin, a Chinese American boy dealing with ostracism and bullying, Danny, a blonde white teen with a surreally stereotypical Chinese cousin, and the Monkey King, a hero from Chinese folklore seeking to become the equal of creator god Tze-Yo-Tzuh. All three are linked with themes about pride, identity, vanity and self-acceptance. At the end, they come together in a way that is clever, surprising and satisfying.
  • Characterization
    • The protagonists are all various types of hot messes, but you can’t help root for them anyway. You see where everyone is coming from, and want them to hurry up and learn their lesson so they can be happy.
    • Special shout out to the monk Wong Lai-Tsao. I love seeing hapless, unassuming people get a moment in the spotlight, especially when that comes from being who they are, not despite it.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • It’s loads of fun, then surprisingly thought provoking. It’s a book I read once and thinking, “yeah, that was pretty good”, but found myself obsessing over it for years after. Like any story with a good twist, it’s highly re-readable; you will catch new things each time around.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
  • Content Warnings
    • Naturally, the main conflicts all revolve around characters overcoming stereotyping, bigotry and ostracism; apart from that, the content is all very lighthearted and tame.
  • Quotes
    • “It’s easy to become anything you wish . . . so long as you’re willing to forfeit your soul.”
    • “You know, Jin, I would have saved myself from five hundred years’ imprisonment beneath a mountain of rock had I only realized how good it is to be a monkey.”

The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, by Joy Harjo

The Woman Who Fell From The Sky

  • Genre
    • Poetry, Free Verse
  • Plot Summary
    • A collection of poems about heritage, pain, personal growth, love and hope in the face of grief. 
  • Character Empathy
    • Interesting. You see mostly people in fragmented moments and sideways glances, but these still evoke a strong sense of personality, perhaps because they capture the contradictions, frailties and dilemmas that make up real humans.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • The first thing that came to mind is that this book is like water. I love wading into big cool lakes, finding an open space and just floating in the middle; this book gave me that feeling. It’s a force of nature, but gently immersive. It’s dynamic, but peaceful. The sentences are deliberately long, so you get a little lost in the hops from concept to concept, but the sense of an emotion or idea completely captures you. It’s a book to reread and reread, not so much to understand it better, as to understand how you understood it so well the first time around.
    • There’s also a permeating, thunderingly fierce sense of love. She talks often about the power of love and kindness; not mere civility, but the kind of determined, transformative love that shows up in small moments, but takes real courage to show.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • The end of each poem has notes on the inspiration, whether historical or personal, and extra little reflections. I love it when authors do that. 
    • Look, this is a book of absurdly pretty poems. Do you like absurdly pretty poems? Ones where you’ll read it and totally lose track of your surroundings, because you’re just dwelling on the pure, distilled majesty that is being fed to your eyeballs? Then you’ll like this book. What else do you need?
  • Content Warnings
    • Some allusions to abuse and oppression, but nothing graphic.
  • Quotes
    • “If we cry more tears we will ruin the land with salt; instead let’s praise that which would distract us with despair. Make a song for death, a song with yellow teeth and bad breath. For loneliness, the house guest who eats everything and refuses to leave. A song for bad weather so we can stand together under our leaking roof, and make a terrible music with our wise and ragged bones.”
    • “Every day is a reenactment of the creation story. We emerge from dense unspeakable material, through the shimmering power of dreaming stuff.”
    • “Truth can appear as disaster in a land of things unspoken.”
    • “(When a people institute a bureaucratic department to service justice then be suspicious. False justice is not justified by massive structure, just as the sacred is not confineable to buildings constructed for the purpose of worship.)
    • “Her mother has business in the house of chaos. She is a prophet disguised as a young mother who is looking for a job.”
    • I’m sorry, said the house who sat down by the man who’d taken refuge in the street. The inhabitants could be heard disappearing through aluminum walls as the boy bent to the slap and beating by the father who was charged with loving and nothing in him could answer to that angel. I could not protect you, cried the house: Though the house gleamed with appliances. Though the house was built with postwar money and hope. Though the house was their haven after the war. Though the war never ended.”
    • “When I hear crows talking, death is a central topic, Death often occurs in clusters, they say. They watch the effect like a wave that moves out from the center of the question. The magnetic force is attractive and can make you want to fly to the other side of the sky.”
    • All acts of kindness are lights in the war for justice.”

The Tell-Tale Brain, by V. S. Ramachandran

The Tell Tale Brain

  • Genre
    • Non-Fiction, Neuroscience, Behavioral Science
  • Summary
    • A world renowned neuroscientist ponders the biological roots of human nature.
  • Information
    • God, what isn’t here? Maybe it will be easier if I just give some of the chapter titles.
    • Phantom Limbs and Plastic Brains
    • Seeing and Knowing
    • The Power of Babble – The Evolution of Language
    • An Ape With a Soul – How Introspection Evolved
    • Loud Colors and Hot Babes – Synesthesia.
    • Yeah, that’s just a sampling. He goes into everything. EVERYTHING.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • The quotes below give a good sense of his prose style. V. S. Ramachandran has a strong sense of the poetic and the philosophical and he weaves them together with practical, empirical data to create some of the most beautiful musings on the nature of humanity.
    • He avoids one of the most common pitfalls of people writing about psychology and neuroscience; he admits that the information is actively evolving. Human behavior brings in a whole new host of variables that are hard to control for, as well as a whole new minefield of experimenter biases. I’ve read too many books and articles that say, “this particular hormone did this in that test and this in that other, therefore it definitely one hundred percent explains why teenage girls talk on the phone all the time.” Yeah, that’s a reference to an actual book I read. Ugh. Anyway, back to the positives. In this book, if he says something is well-established, it’s because it’s actually well established. Other times, he goes into further studies we should do, possible alternative explanations, and the questions we still have. Where others plop down and try to insist that where we are is where the answers are, he gets you excited about the vast unexplored horizon ahead.
    • The above is especially a relief when he starts talking about issues like autism, where so many are proud to announce their theories as if they should be crowned Ultimate Solver of All The Things before they retire to a castle on their own private island. V. S. Ramachandran has theories and presents evidence, but he has the guts to admit there’s a lot of research left to do.
    • He’s also got a wonderful gift for making the technical understandable. Even someone fairly new to the subject material can follow him easily.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • His theories on the roots and evolution of aesthetics are absolutely fascinating and have kept me thinking for years.
    • So much psychological and neuroscientific writing ignores the most scientifically fascinating part of humanity; the fact that we can vary in the strangest, most unpredictable, most counterintuitive ways. It creates a reductive look at human behavior and leaves people out. V. S. Ramachandran takes the opposite approach. He actively embraces humanities little varieties and quirks. He covers apotemnophilia, synaesthesia, theories on biological causes for being transgender (I really enjoyed this part) and more. Even where I disagree, or think he’s only got part of the picture, I love that he sees those things as not just part of humanity, but essential to fully understanding it.
    • There’s just too much in this book. It’s fun and fascinating and beautiful and if you like science you should read it.
  • Content Warnings
    • Not applicable
  • Quotes
    • “What do we mean by “knowledge” or “understanding”? And how do billions of neurons achieve them? These are complete mysteries. Admittedly, cognitive neuroscientists are still very vague about the exact meaning of words like “understand,” “think,” and indeed the word “meaning” itself.”
    • “Yet as human beings we have to accept-with humility-that the question of ultimate origins will always remain with us, no matter how deeply we understand the brain and the cosmos that it creates.”
    • “How can a three-pound mass of jelly that you can hold in your palm imagine angels, contemplate the meaning of infinity, and even question its own place in the cosmos? Especially awe inspiring is the fact that any single brain, including yours, is made up of atoms that were forged in the hearts of countless, far-flung stars billions of years ago. These particles drifted for eons and light-years until gravity and change brought them together here, now. These atoms now form a conglomerate- your brain- that can not only ponder the very stars that gave it birth but can also think about its own ability to think and wonder about its own ability to wonder. With the arrival of humans, it has been said, the universe has suddenly become conscious of itself. This, truly, it the greatest mystery of all.”

Falling in Love With Hominids, by Nalo Hopkinson

falling-in-love-with-hominids

  • Genre
    • Short stories, Folklore, Urban Fantasy
  • Plot Summary
    • Eighteen short stories from one of my favorite authors. The topics wander from apocalypse to mourning to falling in love to loving yourself to discovering a giant flying elephant in your apartment. What they have in common is that they are all amazing. 
  • Character Empathy
    • It’s Nalo Hopkinson. If you don’t both like and relate to at least 90% of the characters, you’re probably a sociopath.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • The stories cover a wide range of emotions. There’s funny, sad, scary, trippy, wistful, triumphant… what they all have in common is the characteristic weird and fun originality that you get from Nalo Hopkinson every time.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • One of the creepiest werewolf stories I’ve ever read (and you know how I feel about werewolves). 
    • A giant flying elephant. Did I mention that already?
    • Sometimes the protagonist is queer in a “this is one of several things about the person and not the most important thing at all” way.
    • A cherry tree who is really into body positivity and women power.
    • Look, every story here has multiple cool shiny things, and I don’t want to spoil them all because it is really fun to go in blind and discover them. Just go read it!
  • Content Warnings
    • You’ll be fine
  • Quotes
    • (From the Intro) “I’ve learned I can trust that humans in general will strive to make things better for themselves and their communities. Not all of us. Not always in principled, loving, or respectful ways. Often the direct opposite, in fact. But we’re all on the same spinning ball of dirt, trying to live as best we can. Yes, that’s almost overweeningingly Pollyanna-ish, despite the fact that sometimes I just need to shake my fist at a mofo.”

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, by Caitlin Doughty

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

  • Genre
    • Nonfiction
  • Summary
    • A mortician describes her early years of working at a crematory, blending her experiences in the industry with insights into the human struggle to deal with death. 
  • Information
    • There’s a little of everything in here. There’s biology, history, anthropology, economics, and a fair bit of practical philosophy. She explores what actually happens when the body dies, how our attitudes towards death have changed, how different cultures around the world deal with death, and what our knowledge of our own imminent demise does to make us human beings.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • If you’ve watched her Youtube channel, you’re probably well prepared for Caitlin Doughty’s style. She’s funny and poignant all at once, mixing wry observations and weird anecdotes with some of the most beautifully existential musings you’ll ever hear. 
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • I love her descriptions of the people she meets. She can simultaneously make you smile at someone’s human foibles and deeply empathize with them as people going through one of the hardest experiences a human will have to bear; burying a loved one. 
    • I also love when she talks about non-Western attitudes towards death. There’s a bit where she describes the cosmology and beliefs of a certain cannibalistic society, and what that act actually means to them, and soon I was thinking, “aw, that’s really sweet.” I got teary when I heard about how the colonialists came in and made them stop. Stupid imperialists.
    • If this book has a main goal, it’s to make you think more complexly about death and how we deal with it, and to see how our society in particular has gotten seriously bad at providing ways for people to cope. I keep wanting to say something like, “this book isn’t for everyone, but if it sounds like something you’d be into, you’re definitely right.” But I also want to recommend this to people who wouldn’t think they’d be into it. I want this book to be read by people who are afraid of death, afraid of thinking about it, afraid of examining their reaction to it. I feel like, with all the disturbing elements, this book will make you realize that you can see the realities of death and, afterwards, you’ll still be okay. Death is inevitable. It doesn’t have to be terrifying.
  • Content Warnings
    • Descriptions of decomposition and dead bodies. How they die is mentioned but not generally described in detail. 
    • She also reflects on her own mental health experiences. Some of this might be triggering, especially for those with a history of suicide.
  • Quotes
    • “Accepting death doesn’t mean you won’t be devastated when someone you love dies. It means you will be able to focus on your grief, unburdened by bigger existential questions like, “Why do people die?” and “Why is this happening to me?” Death isn’t happening to you. Death is happening to us all.”
    • “Death might appear to destroy the meaning in our lives, but in fact it is the very source of our creativity. As Kafka said, “The meaning of life is that it ends.” Death is the engine that keeps us running, giving us the motivation to achieve, learn, love, and create.”
    • “The great triumph (or horrible tragedy, depending on how you look at it) of being human is that our brains have evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to understand our mortality. We are, sadly, self-aware creatures. Even if we move through the day finding creative ways to deny our mortality, no matter how powerful, loved, or special we may feel, we know we are ultimately doomed to death and decay. This is a mental burden shared by precious few other species on Earth.”
    • “If my decomposing carcass helps nourish the roots of a juniper tree or the wings of a vulture—that is immortality enough for me. And as much as anyone deserves.”

A Long Way Gone, by Ishmael Beah

A Long Way Gone

  • Genre
    • Non-Fiction, Memoir
  • Summary
    • Ishmael Beah takes us through the loss of his home during the wars in Sierre Leone, his recruitment by the army to become a child soldier, and his eventual rescue and rehabilitation.
  • Information
    • I was scared to read this book. The idea of forcing children to do your violence for you seems worse to me than killing them. I couldn’t imagine, if I was taught to kill as little kid, how I could ever go back to being a remotely functional human being. I was terrified to be in the mind of somebody who had gone through this. That same fear is what drove me to try it. I had to know what this is really like. 
    • I was wrong, of course. Ishmael Beah did become a functional human being. More than that, an extraordinary one. He found family, friends, redemption and purpose. I’ve always been someone who wanted to believe in transformation, in transcending even the most impossible circumstances. He doesn’t sugar coat that process. He is honest about how hard it was, and how some of his friends didn’t make it out.
    • This book taught me more about humanity than any ten psychology textbooks.
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • Strangely beautiful. Ishmael Beah is a person of incredible hope, perception and appreciation for the little things. He’s a music lover and a loyal friend. These things kept him alive, and it seems important to him to convey not just the bad of his life, but the good, and the way that even when those good things were incredibly small, they could mean everything.
    • This book skips directly from his life before being caught up in the army to the day he was rescued and began his rehabilitation. His boy soldier days are told in flashback, concurrently with his recovery. That was a mercy; I don’t think I could have gotten through it if there had been page after page of unrelieved battle.
    • Also, it seems to reflect how he himself perceived it. Any time they weren’t training or fighting, the soldiers got the children high on drugs and plopped them in front of a movie screen; usually something violent like Rambo. The days of actual fighting were a blur until therapy began.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • Beah is just a great storyteller. There are so many little scenes that stuck in my mind, because he tells them so well.
  • Content Warnings
    • There is incredible violence here, though not always where you’d expect it. He tends to skim and spare us the gory battles, but preserve smaller moments, like the times before his soldier days when villagers would beat his friends out of their homes, just because they had learned to fear all strangers, even young boys. This has the effect of letting you understand the depth of the ugliness of their world, without drowning you in it. He is not writing a slasher film. His goal is not to shock and disgust you. His goal is to make you understand how someone can survive something so terrible.
  • Quotes
    • “Some nights the sky wept stars that quickly floated and disappeared into the darkness before our wishes could meet them. ”
    • “When I was young, my father used to say, ‘If you are alive, there is hope for a better day and something good to happen. If there is nothing good left in the destiny of a person, he or she will die.’ I thought about these words during my journey, and they kept me moving even when I didn’t know where I was going. Those words became the vehicle that drove my spirit forward and made it stay alive.”
    • “I joined the army to avenge the deaths of my family and to survive, but I’ve come to learn that if I am going to take revenge, in that process I will kill another person whose family will want revenge; then revenge and revenge and revenge will never come to an end…”
    • “…children have the resilience to outlive their sufferings, if given a chance.”

Empress of a Thousand Skies, by Rhoda Belleza

Empress of a Thousand Skies

  • Genre
    • Science Fiction, Soap Opera, Youth Adult
  • Plot Summary
    • Princess Rhiannon Ta’an is the last survivor of her assassinated dynasty. Upon her coming of age, the world expects her to take her throne. She intends to take vengeance. 
  • Character Empathy
    • This is a more plot and setting focused story, but thankfully the characters weren’t neglected. The chapters jump back and forth between Rhee, the princess, and Alyosha, a soldier who gets caught up in events. Rhee was a real surprise to me. The author wasn’t afraid to let her get dirty, both physically and emotionally. She goes through shit, she reacts badly, she is impulsive and well, a teenager. It was fascinating to read teen royalty who, instead of being wise beyond their years, was wise at exactly-her-years, and awfully banged up inside to boot. And despite, how raw and angry she was, I still cared about her. Alyosha, meanwhile, was also wounded and naive in his own ways, but a bit sweeter and more mature. He was a unique person, but had a more familiar protagonisty flavor The two perspectives complimented each other perfectly; Alyosha kept the book from being bogged down while Rhee kept surprising me. 
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • Exciting! It was one of those books I got through in just a couple days, because I was too eager to find out what happened next.
    • It is the first of a series, and leaves some unanswered questions at the end. But thankfully it wasn’t one of those that felt like it just stopped before the last scene. The characters went through real change, the questions that could be answered were, and the ones left were the ones that really felt too big to be satisfactorily resolved in a single book.
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • The technology in this is not only cool, but well used. I’ve seen too many stories where something with mind-boggling implications is just used in one limited context, and the rest of the world has never heard of it. In this book, there’s a bit of tech that I thought was just background world building, but it keeps coming up again and again. Not only was it used in multiple ways throughout the setting, but the ethical issues and potential for abuse ended up being key to the ever deepening layers of conflict. I really loved it.
    • Dwarf planets! She uses dwarf planets to justify the single-biome tropes, and also throw in some cool stuff with gravity and weird geography. I’ve been wanting to see people embrace dwarf planets as a new and cool thing instead of a travesty inflicted on Pluto, so this made me really nerd-happy. 
    • The plot justified itself well. By which I mean, I’m used to tolerating a certain degree of coincidence to get through a story, especially when an author clearly wants to have fun, but in this one there kept being a perfectly thought out explanation, even when I was prepared to expect that there wouldn’t been.
  • Content Warnings
    • It’s an action adventure book, so there’s some fights. A few of them are pretty brutal, which I actually liked. In this story, violence isn’t just a video game. It not meant to be glamorous; it’s scary, and has real impacts on the character’s lives.
  • Quotes
    • “If all we are is what people think we are, then we’re all screwed.”

Dealing With Dragons, by Patricia C. Wrede

Dealing With Dragons

  • Genre
    • Fantasy, Comedy, Young Adult
  • Plot Summary
    • To escape an unwanted engagement to an insufferably dull prince, Princess Cimorene volunteers to become a dragon’s princess. This turns out to be a great career move. 
  • Character Empathy
    • This book has some of the most likable characters I’ve ever read. Special shoutout to Princess Cimorene. She was the first spirited, non-traditional princess I read, and most who came afterwards haven’t lived up to her. Too many authors aim for rebellious and hit spoiled brat. Cimorene is someone you would want to invite over for a dinner party, and wouldn’t mind asking to grab some chairs or watch the grill while you get the drinks set out. 
  • Tone: What’s it Like to Read This Book?
    • Adorable and goofy and really, really fun. 
  • Other Shiny Stuff
    • Morwen. She’s a sensible, scrupulously neat witch who keeps nine cats, none of which are black. All the traditionally warty witches think she’s a hopeless mess and Morwen gives zero shits.
    • Negotiations with an accidentally freed genie; one of the funniest scenes I’ve ever read.
    • Patricia C. Wrede uses a great mix of famous and obscure fairy tales. When updated-fairy-tale-mashup stories rely too hard on the ones everyone knows, it gets really easy to see where everything is going. She included some that even I hadn’t heard of before, which kept things interesting.
    • So many feminism metaphors. And, you know, just straightforward feminism.
    • If you like it as much as I do, there are three more books in the series.
  • Content Warnings
    • You’re good
  • Quotes
    • “Well,” said the frog, “what are you going to do about it?”  “Marrying Therandil? I don’t know. I’ve tried talking to my parents, but they won’t listen, and neither will Therandil.” “I didn’t ask what you’d said about it,” the frog snapped. “I asked what you’re going to do. Nine times out of ten, talking is a way of avoiding doing things.”
    • “Then they gave me a loaf of bread and told me to walk through the forest and give some to anyone who asked. I did exactly what they told me, and the second beggar-woman was a fairy in disguise, but instead of saying that whenever I spoke, diamonds and roses would drop from my mouth, she said that since I was so kind, I would never have any problems with my teeth.” “Really? Did it work?” “Well, I haven’t had a toothache since I met her.”  “I’d much rather have good teeth than have diamonds and roses drop out of my mouth whenever I said something”
    • “No proper princess would come out looking for dragons,” Woraug objected.”Well I’m not a proper princess then!” Cimorene snapped. “I make cherries jubillee and I volunteer for dragons, and I conjugate Latin verbs– or at least I would if anyone would let me. So there!”